April Is Minority Health Month

Getting healthy and active as a family, a community and a nation, to combat some of the major illnesses we face as minorities and people of color.


This year’s theme provided by the Office of Minority Health (OMH) and minority health advocates around the nation is an opportunity to advance health outcomes by highlighting the benefits of incorporating small amounts of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity into your daily routine as recommended by Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans.


One of the best things you can for your health is to move more. Making simple changes can transform your health tremendously by reducing the risks of chronic illnesses that are common in minority groups. It doesn’t have to be anything dramatic just a commitment to physical activity for at least 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week, is all it takes to see and feel results.


Only 1 in 4 adults and 1-5 high school kids meet the daily recommended activity guidelines for cardio and resistance training. Unfortunately, these numbers are even lower in minority communities. Within minorities, the prevalence of having some sort of chronic disease is greater. Physical activity is one way to improve your health both physically and mentally.


Our children need physical movement at a younger age, now more than ever. Children and adolescents starting at age 6 should get at least 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity daily. Remember that children imitate adults. You can start by adding physical activity to your own daily routine and encouraging the children in your life to join you. It starts with you now, to control some of the health issues young adults are faced with earlier in life. Be the change for your legacy.

Springfield is all about community and building a healthy community should be one of our greatest priorities. We can create easy and safe options for physical activity that can help every person in Southwest Missouri be more active as we live, learn, work, and play together.

Teaming up with members of our church-es, creating walking groups with your friends, visiting local gyms and forming groups that are dedicated to getting more physical activity is one way to start.


The U.S Department of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health (OMH) along with CDC’s Office of Minority Health and Health Equity (OMHHE) encourages the advancement of health equity by sharing why physical activity matters and the benefits of physical activity. The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, 2nd edition outlines the amounts and types of physical activity needed to maintain or improve overall health and reduce the risk of chronic disease. The Move Your Way Campaign provides resources to help explain the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans.


If you need help creating a healthy habit plan to get more physical activity, contact me for a special offer for the readers of Unite to help get you moving. Your life, health, and well-being start with putting one step forward, making a commitment to yourself to do what-ever it takes to live your life happily and in good health. Let me help you get started. Be the change for your legacy.